Poetry

Lesson 3
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ELA

Unit 7

3rd Grade

Lesson 3 of 12

Objective


Explain why some poets choose to include onomatopoeia by identifying and explaining the elements of poetry found in various poems about nature.

Readings and Materials


  • Book: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children by Jack Prelutsky (September, 1983)  pp. 77 – 79

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Target Task


Multiple Choice

What is onomatopoeia?

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Which line from “Fishes’ Evening Song” is an example of onomatopoeia?

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Writing Prompt

Why do poets choose to include onomatopoeia? How does onomatopoeia help a reader better understand a poem's message? Use examples from multiple poems to support your answer.

Sample Response

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Key Questions


  • "The Flattered Flying Fish": What is the significance of the title? What mood does the title set? (Make sure students notice the alliteration.)

  • "The Flattered Flying Fish": Does the poet use rhyme scheme or free verse? What mood does it set?

  • "The Flattered Flying Fish": How does the poet convey the central message of the poem?

  • "Fishes' Evening Song": Identify the onomatopoeia. What is the effect of the onomatopoeia?

  • "Fishes' Evening Song": How does the poet convey the central message of the poem?

  • "Brontosaurus": Identify the onomatopoeia. What is the effect of the onomatopoeia?

  • "Brontosaurus": How does the poet convey the central message of the poem?

Vocabulary


onomatopoeia

Notes


  • Continue to spiral and have students notice rhyme scheme or free verse, alliteration, and similes in the poems that aren't the focus poems. Also continue to ALWAYS push students to think about the main message or theme of each poem.
  • Today's focus: onomatopoeia (See notes in vocabulary/content knowledge section for definitions.)

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Common Core Standards


  • RL.3.5 — Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
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Lesson 2

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Lesson 4

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